Resveratrol supplements lower blood glucose in Type 2 Diabetes patients

A recent study of resveratrol supplementation for people with Type 2 diabetes confirms the benefit of the supplement. The diabetes patients were under treatment at the time of the study. After 45 days, the study group taking the resveratrol instead of the placebo showed significantly decreased systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, while their HDL (the so-called “good cholesterol”) was significantly increased, when compared to their baseline levels. The authors of the research conclude that resveratrol exerts “strong antidiabetic effects in patients with type 2 diabetes.”

While this study reinforces findings about the benefits of supplementing with resveratrol for people with Type 2 diabetes, we at NYBC would like to repeat our recommendation to discuss with your healthcare provider any use of the supplement as part of your ongoing treatment for diabetes.

See the NYBC catalog for further information:

RESVERATROL – Jarrow

RESVERATROL SYNERGY – Jarrow

Reference:
Movahed, A et al. Antihyperglycemic effects of short term resveratrol supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients. Evidence Based Complementary Alternative Medicine. 2013;2013:851267. doi: 10.1155/2013/851267. Epub 2013 Sep 1.

Advertisements

Resveratrol: more evidence of its potential benefits

Resveratrol, found in red wine and now widely used as a supplement, is back in the news this month. A research report in the highly respected journal Science identifies the precise mechanism by which resveratrol regulates sirtuins, proteins in the body which have been linked to the prevention of many age-related diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s, and Type-2 diabetes.

This finding adds further support to the idea that resveratrol or a derivative of resveratrol might represent a breakthrough treatment for some of the major disease threats faced by humans as they age.

We first read about the new research in our hometown paper, The New York Times, but the story has been widely reported. (See reference to the article in Science below.)

NYBC stocks Resveratrol and Resveratrol Synergy from Jarrow. Of course we’d welcome any reports from our members about their use of these products.

Reference: Hubbard, et al. Evidence for a common mechanism of SIRT1 regulation by allosteric activators. Science, March 8, 2013.

National Institutes of Health: How Resveratrol Works

Resveratrol, a compound found most famously in red wine, is the subject of a Feb. 13, 2012 news release by the National Institutes of Health. The NIH reports on a new study that identified the precise biochemical mechanism in the body that seems to be responsible for resveratrol’s ability to mitigate the harmful health effects of a high-fat diet.

One of the earliest reasons for scientific interest in resveratrol was the perception that people who drank a lot of red wine could also eat a relatively high fat diet, yet still have a rather low risk of cardiovascular disease. (This was the so-called “French paradox,” much discussed in the US media in the early 1990s.) The current NIH-supported study found evidence that resveratrol affects specific biochemical pathways that block the ill effects of a high-fat diet, such as obesity, glucose intolerance, and, potentially, the development of Type 2 diabetes. (Type 2 diabetes, in turn, is a risk factor for coronary heart disease.)

This NIH-supported study follows a pattern we’ve often seen before: the health benefits of a natural product are noted in general population studies, and eventually laboratory science allows us to home in on the exact mechanisms by which the natural substance works. Needless to say, we’re all for this kind of research to confirm and refine our knowledge of supplements!

Read more about the resveratrol study at:
http://www.nih.gov/researchmatters/february2012/02132012resveratrol.htm

You can find resveratrol in two forms at the NYBC. (Resveratrol Synergy adds some of the additional parts of the grape that are thought to have health benefits, and combines those with green tea extract, another food extract that researchers believe may have health benefits.)

Resveratrol
Resveratrol Synergy

Resveratrol and Resveratrol Synergy supplements

We were interested to see in today’s online edition of our hometown newspaper, The New York Times, a news report on the latest research about resveratrol and related compounds:

“Drug Is Found to Extend the Lives of Obese Mice”

The article points to the promise of continuing research on resveratrol derivatives, while also reviewing some of the questions that remain before large-scale human trials of the sort that can lead the breakthroughs in drug development. One of NYBC’s concerns, as always, has been that the real benefits of the non-prescription supplement itself could be ignored in the quest for some patentable super-drug (which would undoubtedly make the pharmaceutical company rich, no doubt!)

So, to review, there have been a number of research developments in just the past couple of years about the basic resveratrol molecule itself–the very same one that you can find in supplements now stocked by NYBC. Here’s an excerpt from our post earlier this year:

For a while it seemed like the excitement about resveratrol–the molecule famously found in red wine–had died down.

A few years ago widely publicized studies showed that resveratrol had potential as a life-extending supplement (it showed that capacity in lab animals). And there was buzz when companies raised hundreds of millions in venture capital to explore the possibilities further. One catch with that high-profile research was that it involved very high doses of resveratrol. (The equivalent of drinking hundreds of bottles of red wine a day!)

However, in just the past couple of years, scientific interest has come back to resveratrol, and this time it is pointing to substantial health benefits without those massive doses.

First, cardiovascular health. In 2009, a Univ. of Wisconsin research team reported that low doses of resveratrol in the diet of middle-aged mice could have many of the same effects as the high dose reseveratrol, especially in terms of protecting heart health. Second, in 2010, Johns Hopkins researchers reported on a mechanism by which resveratrol shielded mice from stroke damage to the brain. A single small dose of the compound increased levels of an enzyme that protects nerve cells in the brain from damage when blood flow is disrupted by stroke.

It’s also just been announced that the scientific research organization of Denmark will run a multi-year study of resveratrol for diabetes. This announcement follows the news from December 2010 that our hometown Albert Einstein Medical Center has been awarded an NIH grant, also for a study of resveratrol and diabetes.

All in all, resveratrol seems to remain a very promising research topic!

You can find resveratrol in two forms at the NYBC. (Resveratrol Synergy adds some of the additional parts of the grape that are thought to have health benefits, and combines those with green tea extract, another food extract that researchers believe may have health benefits.)

Resveratrol

Resveratrol Synergy

Resveratrol again!

For a while it seemed like the excitement about resveratrol–the molecule famously found in red wine–had died down.

A few years ago widely publicized studies showed that resveratrol had potential as a life-extending supplement (it showed that capacity in lab animals). And there was buzz when companies raised hundreds of millions in venture capital to explore the possibilities further. One catch with that high-profile research was that it involved very high doses of resveratrol. (The equivalent of drinking hundreds of bottles of red wine a day!)

However, in just the past couple of years, scientific interest has come back to resveratrol, and this time it is pointing to substantial health benefits without those massive doses.

First, cardiovascular health. In 2009, a Univ. of Wisconsin research team reported that low doses of resveratrol in the diet of middle-aged mice could have many of the same effects as the high dose reseveratrol, especially in terms of protecting heart health. Second, in 2010, John Hopkins researchers reported on a mechanism by which resveratrol shielded mice from stroke damage to the brain. A single small dose of the compound increased levels of an enzyme that protects nerve cells in the brain from damage when blood flow is disrupted by stroke.

It’s also just been announced that the scientific research organization of Denmark will run a multi-year study of resveratrol for diabetes. This announcement follows the news from December 2010 that our hometown Albert Einstein Medical Center has been awarded an NIH grant, also for a study of resveratrol and diabetes.

All in all, resveratrol seems to remain a very promising research topic!

You can find resveratrol in two forms at the NYBC. (Resveratrol Synergy adds some of the additional parts of the grape that are thought to have health benefits, and combines those with green tea extract, another food extract that researchers believe may have health bnenefits.)

Resveratrol

Resveratrol Synergy

Resveratrol and Resveratrol Synergy

Recent well-regarded research has provided evidence that resveratrol can decrease the kinds of inflammation associated with heart disease, and can improve motor coordination, reduce cataract formation and preserve bone mineral density in aging laboratory animals. (See, for example, the report on an NIH-funded study published in the journal Cell Metabolism in August 2008.) In short, resveratrol may counteract many typical types of age-related deterioration in the body. As the researchers have noted, these anti-aging effects mimic the effect of drastically reducing (by 30-50%) food intake—but without requiring such a near-starvation diet.

That’s the recent research background on resveratrol. We’ll also note that resveratrol as a compound with potential health benefits was originally isolated as a component of red wine. Of course, in supplement form resveratrol can provide its health benefits without requiring the user to drink alcohol. That’s a practical advantage to supplementation that can’t be ignored.

Note that in addition to “Resveratrol,” NYBC also offers a compound supplement from Jarrow called “Resveratrol Synergy.” This product includes includes resveratrol, grape seed extract, and green tea extract. Grape seed extract has been studied mostly for cardiovascular support, while green tea has recently accumulated some interesting research supporting its anti-cancer and anti-aging effects.

To read more about these two supplements, see the NYBC entries:

Resveratrol: http://nybcsecure.org/product_info.php?cPath=50&products_id=330

and

Resveratrol Synergy: http://nybcsecure.org/product_info.php?cPath=50&products_id=245

Info sheet on “Supplements studied for diabetes/insulin resistance”

NYBC has prepared an updated version of its info sheet on the topic of supplements that have been studied for diabetes or insulin resistance. Here’s the text below:

SUPPLEMENTS STUDIED FOR DIABETES/INSULIN RESISTANCE

Multivitamin/multimineral: Regular use of a multivitamin/multimineral supplement helps people with diabetes maintain good health and reduce infections. Clinical evidence indicates that diabetics have unique nutritional needs, and should take a daily multivitamin to supplement their normal diet.

Note: NYBC stocks Jarrow’s Multi 1-to-3; Douglas Lab’s Added Protection, and SuperNutrition’s family of multivitamins (such as the Opti-Pack).

Reference: Barringer, et al. Effect of a Multivitamin and Mineral Supplement on Infection and Quality of Life. Annals of Internal Medicine. 3/4/2003.

Omega-3 fatty acids (Fish Oil): Many people with diabetes have high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Omega-3 fatty acids have shown benefit for cardiovascular health in recent randomized controlled clinical trials. The FDA has also approved a health claim for fish oil: “supporting but not conclusive evidence shows that the consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.”

Note: NYBC stocks Max DHA –Omega-3 Fish Oil Purified by Molecular Distillation (Jarrow); and ProOmega –Nordic Naturals (60 softgels or 180 softgels).

Alpha-Lipoic Acid: Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA) has the ability to assist with glucose metabolism, and also promotes healthy nerve function. A recent study concluded that ALA (600mg) could be useful in helping to treat the symptoms of diabetes-related neuropathy (= generally, pain, tingling, numbness in feet and hands).

Note: NYBC stocks ALA (Montiff) 300mg/60.

Reference: Ametov et al. The sensory symptoms of diabetic polyneuropathy are improved with alpha-lipoic acid: The SYDNEY Trial. Diabetes Care. 2003, 26 (3)

Other supplements studied for diabetes: Chromium and biotin (these two supplements, taken together, are believed to play an active role in balancing insulin production with glucose uptake). Also: evening primrose oil, resveratrol, bitter melon.

Talk to your doctor before you use these or other supplements. Do not discontinue medications you are taking for diabetes/glucose control without first discussing with your healthcare provider any complementary treatments you are considering!