The Real Story On Niacin: Niacin associated with significant reductions in cardiovascular disease and mortality

You may have heard some recent reports on Niacin (one of the B-vitamins) that seemed to suggest it wasn’t of benefit for cardiovascular disease. Actually, the recent studies fueling these reports only looked at certain special forms of niacin taken together with a statin drug. These studies proved a disappointment to the statin drug makers, because the research didn’t show any additional benefit in adding the niacin. (By the way, some researchers have pointed out problems with the special forms of niacin used in these studies.)

Given the confusion in some news reports about Niacin, we at NYBC think it’s important to repeat what researchers stated about Niacin in a March 2014 article in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics. This article reviewed the recent Niacin studies, and also reiterated the well-known and well-documented benefits of Niacin for cardiovascular health:

1. In a long-term study called the Coronary Drug Project, “niacin treatment was associated with significant reductions in cardiovascular events and long-term mortality, similar to the reductions seen in the statin monotherapy trials.”

2. “In combination trials, niacin plus a statin or bile acid sequestrant produces additive reductions in coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality and promotes regression of coronary atherosclerosis.”

3. Niacin is the “most powerful agent currently available” for RAISING levels of HDL-C (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the so-called “good cholesterol”); and it can also REDUCE levels of triglycerides and LDL-C (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the so-called “bad cholesterol”).

Here’s the reference for these three important points about Niacin:

Boden, W E, Sidhu M S, & Toth P P. The therapeutic role of niacin in dyslipidemia management. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Mar;19(2):141-58. doi: 10.1177/1074248413514481.

NOTE: NYBC stocks Niacin No-Flush (Source Naturals): http://nybcsecure.org/product_info.php?cPath=50&products_id=439; Niacin TR Niatab 500mg (Douglas): http://nybcsecure.org/product_info.php?cPath=50&products_id=249; and
Niacin TR Niatab 100mg (Douglas) http://nybcsecure.org/product_info.php?cPath=50&products_id=252

As always, we strongly recommend that you consult your healthcare provider when using supplements.

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Niatab 500mg from Douglas Labs – sustained release Niacin for use in managing cholesterol

The New York Buyers’ Club now stocks Niatab 500 from Douglas Labs. This timed-release product is better tolerated than regular Niacin formulas (that is, minimizes flushing, which can be bothersome to some), and may be especially helpful to those who are using Niacin on a regular basis in managing their cholesterol.

With federally-funded research now pointing to Niacin + a statin drug as the new standard of preventive care for cardiovascular disease, this is a very welcome addition to the Douglas Labs line. For background on the recent revival of interest in Niacin, see “An Old Cholesterol Remedy is New Again,” by Michael Mason in The New York Times, Jan. 23, 2007.


PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
Niatab™ 500 tablets, provided by Douglas Laboratories®, slowly release 500 mg of pure niacin. Sustained release niacin is better tolerated than regular crystalline high-potency niacin supplements. Niatab 500 is a scored uncoated tablet which can be broken in half when lower dosage is desired.
REFERENCES
Alderman JD et al. Effect of a modified, well-tolerated niacin regimen on serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and the cholesterol to high density lipoprotein ratio. Am J Cardiol 1989;64:725-729.
Canner PL et al. Fifteen year mortality in Coronary Drug Project patients: long-term benefit with niacin. J Am Coll Cardiol 1986;8:1245-1255.
Colletti RB et al. Niacin treatment of hypercholesterolemia in children. Pediatrics 1993;92:78-82.
Keenan JM et al. Niacin revisited: a randomized, controlled trial of wax-matrix sustained-release niacin in hypercholesterolemia. Arch Intern Med 1991;151:1424-1432.
Lavie CJ et al. Marked benefit with sustained-release niacin therapy in patients with ‘isolated’ very low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease. Am J Cardiol 1992;69:1083-1085.
Probstfield JL. Nicotinic acid as a lipoprotein-altering agent: therapy directed by the primary physician. Arch Int Med 1994;154:1557-1559.


Product Description and References from: Douglas Labs Product Info Sheet