Mayo Clinic recommendations: cholesterol-lowering supplements

The Mayo Clinic has a post, updated in 2012, on the topic of “Cholesterol-lowering supplements: Lower your numbers without prescription medication.” As always, we advise you to check with your healthcare provider before starting to use any of these for cholesterol management.

Most of these suggestions have been in the New York Buyers’ Club repertory for quite a while, but we are happy to repeat them here:

Fish oil (omega-3 fatty acids): can lower triglycerides

Green tea: some research on its cholesterol-lowering capacity; epidemiologic evidence suggests that green tea may lower stroke and cardiovascular disease risk. There are several choices for green tea supplements: see Green Tea; Green Tea Decaffeinated; and Green Tea Organic.

Plant sterols: see Cardio Edge for a supplement featuring plant sterols in a formula designed to support healthy cholesterol levels

Garlic extracts: contact NYBC for information on allicin, a garlic extract that has been studied for cardiovascular health

The Mayo Clinic guide also mentions grains, including oat bran and flaxseed, which can lower cholesterol.

Last, the guide discusses red yeast rice, a supplement that can lower LDL cholesterol. Note the caution that some forms of red yeast rice may contain a naturally occurring form of the prescription medication lovastatin. Lovastatin in the supplement may present some dangers to the user, because there is no way to know the quantity or quality of this prescription medication equivalent. For that reason, it is especially important to consult with your healthcare provider and monitor your usage of this supplement.

See the Mayo Clinic guide at

Mayo Clinic: Cholesterol-lowering supplements: Lower your numbers without prescription medication

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Mayo Clinic’s Guide to Alternative Medicine 2011

This is an easy-to-read, magazine-style guide created by the Mayo Clinic, the world-famous healthcare facility which also happens to have a long-standing receptiveness to alternative and complementary therapies for wellness and prevention. (That’s one of the reasons why it has recently been cited as an example of best practices in American healthcare–the kind of practices that need to be more widely imitated.)

The section on dietary supplements provides capsule reviews of the scientific evidence for the safety and effectiveness of several dozen popular products, from botanicals like ginseng, echinacea and St. John’s Wort, to vitamins C, D, E, B-3 (niacin), and B-9 (folate or folic acid), as well as minerals like selenium, calcium and zinc. Also discussed are fairly well-known categories of supplements, including probiotics and omega-3 fatty acids (these often obtained with fish oil supplements).

The guide rates these supplements with a green, yellow or red light symbol, depending on the strength of the evidence for their use and their safety profile. We weren’t too surprised by most of the ratings. For example, green for niacin, folic acid, Vitamin C and Vitamin D, but a yellow caution light for Vitamin E, which has shown no effectiveness in several good studies dealing with cardiovascular health and cancer, leading some researchers to wonder if the standard “alpha-tocopherol” form of the vitamin is a good format for supplementation. Also, a yellow light for St. John’s Wort, not because it isn’t effective for mild/moderate depression, but because it can interact with a lot of other medications.

Other supplements getting the green light from the Mayo Clinic editors: SAMe (for depression); saw palmetto (for enlarged prostate); green tea (for cardiovascular health, possibly for cancer prevention, and apparently–according to a large epidemiological study–for longevity); gamma linolenic acid (for peripheral neuropathy); CoQ10 (for cardiovascular health, for which it’s used by millions in Japan); glucosamine chondroitin (for osteoarthritis).

Also getting the green light, a supplement most have probably never heard of, but which is featured in the Health Concerns formula Cold Away, available from NYBC: the botanical Andrographis (a cold remedy, showing promise where many other products have disappointed).

See the NYBC entries for more details on how best to take supplements:


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