Resveratrol supplements lower blood glucose in Type 2 Diabetes patients

A recent study of resveratrol supplementation for people with Type 2 diabetes confirms the benefit of the supplement. The diabetes patients were under treatment at the time of the study. After 45 days, the study group taking the resveratrol instead of the placebo showed significantly decreased systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, while their HDL (the so-called “good cholesterol”) was significantly increased, when compared to their baseline levels. The authors of the research conclude that resveratrol exerts “strong antidiabetic effects in patients with type 2 diabetes.”

While this study reinforces findings about the benefits of supplementing with resveratrol for people with Type 2 diabetes, we at NYBC would like to repeat our recommendation to discuss with your healthcare provider any use of the supplement as part of your ongoing treatment for diabetes.

See the NYBC catalog for further information:

RESVERATROL – Jarrow

RESVERATROL SYNERGY – Jarrow

Reference:
Movahed, A et al. Antihyperglycemic effects of short term resveratrol supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients. Evidence Based Complementary Alternative Medicine. 2013;2013:851267. doi: 10.1155/2013/851267. Epub 2013 Sep 1.

Advertisements

THE SUPPLEMENT – NYBC’s newsletter -Spring 2010

The latest issue of the New York Buyers’ Club newsletter is now available. This issue’s feature stories include:

Vitamin D: A Supplement for All Seasons? No longer just a cold & flu remedy!

Diabetes: Facts & Figures from the Epidemic With an information sheet on the key supplements that have been studied for diabetes/insulin resistance.

Blog on! Intriguing report on our blog readers’ most-used search terms.

The Power of Garlic Quite a career for the humble garlic bulb: from folk remedy, to Chinese medicinal herb, to a 2006 NIH/American Heart Association reseach study of its effect on cardiovascular function!

NEW @ NYBC A roundup of new botanicals and other supplements now available from NYBC–and why the co-op has chosen to carry them.

—-

You can read and/or download the latest issue of the NYBC newsletter THE SUPPLEMENT at:

http://www.newyorkbuyersclub.org/supplement/index.html

“Supplements and Diabetes” and “Diabetes Facts & Figures”

NYBC INFO SHEET ON SUPPLEMENTS STUDIED FOR DIABETES

Below we describe some of the best recent research on supplements as used for the management of diabetes. More extensive information on these supplements, including recommended dosages, can be found on the NYBC website.

Multivitamin/multimineral: Regular use of a multivitamin/multimineral supplement helps people with diabetes maintain good health and reduce infections. Clinical evidence indicates that diabetics have unique nutritional needs, and should take a daily multivitamin to supplement their normal diet.

Note: NYBC stocks Jarrow’s Multi 1-to-3; Douglas Lab’s Added Protection, and SuperNutrition’s family of multivitamins.

Reference: Barringer, et al. Effect of a Multivitamin and Mineral Supplement on Infection and Quality of Life. Annals of Internal Medicine. 3/4/2003.

Omega-3 fatty acids (Fish Oil): Many people with diabetes have high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Omega-3 fatty acids have shown benefit for cardiovascular health in recent randomized controlled clinical trials. The FDA has also approved a health claim for fish oil: “supporting but not conclusive evidence shows that the consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.”

Note: NYBC stocks Max DHA –Omega-3 Fish Oil Purified by Molecular Distillation (Jarrow); and ProOmega –Nordic Naturals (60 softgels or 180 softgels).

Alpha-Lipoic Acid: Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA) has the ability to assist with glucose metabolism, and also promotes healthy nerve function. A recent study concluded that ALA (600mg/day) could be useful in helping to treat the symptoms of diabetes-related neuropathy (= pain, tingling, numbness in feet and hands). A protocol for diabetic neuropathy using ALA, evening primrose oil and Vitamin C has also been proposed.

Note: NYBC stocks ALA (Montiff) 300mg/60.

Reference: Ametov et al. The sensory symptoms of diabetic polyneuropathy are improved with alpha-lipoic acid: The SYDNEY Trial. Diabetes Care. 2003, 26 (3)

Chromium and Biotin: These two supplements have been proposed as a useful adjunct therapy for poorly controlled diabetes. Chromium is also under investigation for insulin resistance in people with HIV.

Note: NYBC stocks these two supplements from Jarrow.

Reference: Singer, G M, & J Geohas. The effect of chromium picolinate and biotin supplementation on glycemic control in poorly controlled patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetes Technol Ther. Dec. 2006.

Bitter Melon: A popular vegetable in Southeast Asia, Bitter Melon (sometimes called Bitter gourd) contains an insulin-like substance that can lower blood sugar in people with Type 2 diabetes. Warning: Bitter Melon may result in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if combined with other blood glucose-lowering drugs or supplements.

NYBC stocks Bitter Melon (Zhang).

Reference: “Bitter gourd (Momordica Charantia): A dietary approach to hyperglycemia.” Nutrition Rev. July 2006.

B Vitamins: These are recommended for those taking Metformin, the most widely prescribed oral diabetic drug in the US. Metformin depletes B12, B6 and folic acid, which in turn leads to a build-up of homocysteine, linked to cardiovascular disease.
NYBC stocks B-right (Jarrow).

Reference: Zhao-Wei Ting, R et al. “Risk factors of vitamin B12 deficiency in patients receiving metformin.” Archives of Internal Medicine, Oct. 9, 2006.

IMPORTANT: Talk to your doctor before you use these or other supplements. Do not discontinue medications you are taking for diabetes/glucose control without first discussing with your healthcare provider any complementary treatments you are considering! As noted above regarding Bitter Melon, there is a risk of dangerous hypoglycemia if multiple blood sugar-lowering agents are used at the same time.

Diabetes Facts and Figures

–Poor diet (processed foods, fast foods, sweetened drinks) and lack of exercise are major factors in recent large increases in Type 2 Diabetes in the US. (The rate of Type 1 Diabetes, which is largely inborn, remains stable.)

–In 2009, 24 million Americans had diabetes. With no changes in diet and exercise rates, the number of US diabetics is projected to double over the next 25 years and the annual costs of treating the disease will rise from $113 billion to $336 billion.

–Minorities are disproportionately affected by diabetes: African-Americans, Hispanics and Native Americans are almost twice as likely as Whites to have diabetes. A main contributing factor for this disparity is limited healthy food choices and an abundance of bad food choices available in minority communities.

–Childhood obesity, closely linked to the development of diabetes, is now considered epidemic in the US, with 40% of US children overweight and 13% obese. The current generation of US children consequently risk having higher rates of cardiovascular disease and other diabetes-related health problems than their parents’ generation.

–The proportion of people with HIV who also have Type 2 Diabetes is increasing. The effects of combination therapies for HIV appear to increase the risk of Type 2 Diabetes; it is estimated that as many as 80% of people with HIV treated with protease inhibitors may develop insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes (see John G. Ryan, “Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with HIV-1 Infection,” in Insulin, Jan. 2010).

–A class of drugs approved by the FDA as second-line treatment of diabetes has shown a dubious safety record. One of them, Avandia, may have caused hundreds of heart attacks per month and as of early 2010 the FDA was considering whether to ask for its withdrawal from the market.

Vitamin D deficiency in people with HIV/AIDS

The website aidsmap.com has featured a piece on Vitamin D deficiency among people with HIV in its top stories from this year’s annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI, San Francisco, Feb. 2010), one of the main yearly meetings for scientific research on HIV/AIDS. Here’s an excerpt from the report, authored by Derek Thaczuk and published 2/19/2010:

Vitamin D deficiency extremely common among HIV-positive patients in diverse regions
[…]
New analyses have found widespread vitamin D insufficiency among American, Italian and Swiss cohorts of HIV-positive patients. [Note: also reported at CROI was a study looking at health outcomes in Tanzanian women with low vitamin D levels.] These data were presented in a poster session and related discussion at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI).

Vitamin D deficiency was consistently less frequent in Caucasians than in other races. Otherwise, the studies were not entirely consistent as to other risk factors, such as duration or type of antiretroviral treatment.

At the CROI discussion session on Wednesday, moderator Peter Reiss from the University of Amsterdam began by noting that vitamin D deficiency can result in bone density loss, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and insulin resistance, kidney disease, and other metabolic conditions commonly seen in patients with HIV.
[…]
Conclusions

These studies add to a growing body of evidence that insufficient or deficient vitamin D levels are extremely prevalent among persons with HIV. While prevalence figures (and the cutoff values used to define them) vary, these studies reported insufficiency rates of 54% to 72%; figures which are generally consistent with other reports. Studies in women linked vitamin D deficiency with risk of bacterial vaginosis, thrush, and other health problems.

The single factor invariably associated with insufficiency or deficiency was non-Caucasian race. Otherwise, reported risk factors were not entirely consistent, although several studies identified NNRTI and/or efavirenz use.

Investigators agreed that vitamin D deficiency is prevalent among HIV-positive individuals, has harmful effects on health, and is easily addressable through supplementation. Remaining research questions include the link between deficiency and clinical health outcomes, the impact of supplementation, the best doses for supplementation, and closer comparisons of deficiency rates in people with HIV and in the general population, where deficiency is also common.

Read the full story at

http://www.aidsmap.com/en/news/A17781D3-3857-455D-B13B-D7628DF427C7.asp

Info sheet on “Supplements studied for diabetes/insulin resistance”

NYBC has prepared an updated version of its info sheet on the topic of supplements that have been studied for diabetes or insulin resistance. Here’s the text below:

SUPPLEMENTS STUDIED FOR DIABETES/INSULIN RESISTANCE

Multivitamin/multimineral: Regular use of a multivitamin/multimineral supplement helps people with diabetes maintain good health and reduce infections. Clinical evidence indicates that diabetics have unique nutritional needs, and should take a daily multivitamin to supplement their normal diet.

Note: NYBC stocks Jarrow’s Multi 1-to-3; Douglas Lab’s Added Protection, and SuperNutrition’s family of multivitamins (such as the Opti-Pack).

Reference: Barringer, et al. Effect of a Multivitamin and Mineral Supplement on Infection and Quality of Life. Annals of Internal Medicine. 3/4/2003.

Omega-3 fatty acids (Fish Oil): Many people with diabetes have high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Omega-3 fatty acids have shown benefit for cardiovascular health in recent randomized controlled clinical trials. The FDA has also approved a health claim for fish oil: “supporting but not conclusive evidence shows that the consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.”

Note: NYBC stocks Max DHA –Omega-3 Fish Oil Purified by Molecular Distillation (Jarrow); and ProOmega –Nordic Naturals (60 softgels or 180 softgels).

Alpha-Lipoic Acid: Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA) has the ability to assist with glucose metabolism, and also promotes healthy nerve function. A recent study concluded that ALA (600mg) could be useful in helping to treat the symptoms of diabetes-related neuropathy (= generally, pain, tingling, numbness in feet and hands).

Note: NYBC stocks ALA (Montiff) 300mg/60.

Reference: Ametov et al. The sensory symptoms of diabetic polyneuropathy are improved with alpha-lipoic acid: The SYDNEY Trial. Diabetes Care. 2003, 26 (3)

Other supplements studied for diabetes: Chromium and biotin (these two supplements, taken together, are believed to play an active role in balancing insulin production with glucose uptake). Also: evening primrose oil, resveratrol, bitter melon.

Talk to your doctor before you use these or other supplements. Do not discontinue medications you are taking for diabetes/glucose control without first discussing with your healthcare provider any complementary treatments you are considering!

NEW! Managing and Preventing HIV Med Side-Effects

To mark its fifth anniversary, the New York Buyers’ Club has prepared a special edition of SUPPLEMENT. In it you will find a concise Guide to managing and preventing HIV medication side effects with supplements and other complementary and alternative therapies.

This is an invaluable introduction to how nutritional supplements can be used to counter those side effects that can make life miserable–or even disrupt treatment adherence–in people taking antiretroviral medications for HIV.

Read about approaches to dealing with diarrhea, nausea, heart health issues, diabetes, insomnia, fatigue, liver stress, lipodystrophy, anxiety and depression.

This FREE Guide is available online at:

http://newyorkbuyersclub.org/

On the NYBC website you can also SUBSCRIBE to the nonprofit co-op’s quarterly FREE newsletter, THE SUPPLEMENT, which continues to offer a unique perspective on current evidence-based use of supplements for chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease, diabetes/insulin resistance, hepatitis and other liver conditions, anxiety/depression, osteoarthritis, cognitive and neurorological issues, and gastrointestinal dysfunction.

Can carnitine reduce diabetes risk and improve body shape?

We were interested to read about a recent study on carnitine, diabetes risk and body shape in people with HIV, as reported on the CATIE (Canadian AIDS Treatment Information Exchange) website:

Some studies have found less-than-normal levels of carnitine in the blood of HIV positive people. Other studies have found that regular supplementation with carnitine can help to reduce abnormal levels of triglycerides, a fatty substance in the blood. Most of the studies focused on a formulation of carnitine called L-carnitine.

Long-term studies of a different formulation of carnitine—acetyl-L-carnitine—suggest that this substance can help damaged nerves recover from the toxicity of certain anti-HIV drugs such as d4T (Zerit, stavudine) and ddI (Videx EC, didanosine).

Now researchers in Milan, Italy, have conducted a small study with HIV positive volunteers and carnitine, to assess its effects on body composition and other related metabolic parameters. The results from this study suggest the possibility of a decreased risk for diabetes. Furthermore, the research team claims that carnitine supplements increased the fat content in the legs of volunteers. We urge readers to exercise caution when interpreting the results of this small study and we provide critical details later in this CATIE News bulletin.

Read more information on the study at:
http://www.catie.ca/catienews.nsf/00a48c8905294f0b8525717f00661eb8/4c5c394577db43018525763f00731b34!OpenDocument

Read more background information at the NYBC entries:

Acetylcarnitine

and

L-Carnitine