NEW! Managing and Preventing HIV Med Side-Effects

To mark its fifth anniversary, the New York Buyers’ Club has prepared a special edition of SUPPLEMENT. In it you will find a concise Guide to managing and preventing HIV medication side effects with supplements and other complementary and alternative therapies.

This is an invaluable introduction to how nutritional supplements can be used to counter those side effects that can make life miserable–or even disrupt treatment adherence–in people taking antiretroviral medications for HIV.

Read about approaches to dealing with diarrhea, nausea, heart health issues, diabetes, insomnia, fatigue, liver stress, lipodystrophy, anxiety and depression.

This FREE Guide is available online at:

http://newyorkbuyersclub.org/

On the NYBC website you can also SUBSCRIBE to the nonprofit co-op’s quarterly FREE newsletter, THE SUPPLEMENT, which continues to offer a unique perspective on current evidence-based use of supplements for chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease, diabetes/insulin resistance, hepatitis and other liver conditions, anxiety/depression, osteoarthritis, cognitive and neurorological issues, and gastrointestinal dysfunction.

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Niacin and cholesterol control: National Library of Medicine/NIH Review

Here’s the review of Niacin for cholesterol control from Medline Plus, a service of the National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health. Note the caution for those with Type 2 diabetes. 


Niacin is a well-accepted treatment for high cholesterol. Multiple studies show that niacin (not niacinamide) has significant benefits on levels of high-density cholesterol (HDL or “good cholesterol”), with better results than prescription drugs such as “statins” like atorvastatin (Lipitor®). There are also benefits on levels of low-density cholesterol (LDL or “bad cholesterol”), although these effects are less dramatic. Adding niacin to a second drug such as a statin may increase the effects on low-density lipoproteins.The use of niacin for the treatment of dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes has been controversial because of the possibility of worsening glycemic control. Patients should check with a physician and pharmacist before starting niacin.

Reference: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-niacin.html


See also NYBC’s description of Niacin 100mg and Niacin 400mg. These are timed-release formulas; also provided are guides for minimizing the “flushing” that can accompany niacin use.