Mayo Clinic recommendations: cholesterol-lowering supplements

The Mayo Clinic has a post, updated in 2012, on the topic of “Cholesterol-lowering supplements: Lower your numbers without prescription medication.” As always, we advise you to check with your healthcare provider before starting to use any of these for cholesterol management.

Most of these suggestions have been in the New York Buyers’ Club repertory for quite a while, but we are happy to repeat them here:

Fish oil (omega-3 fatty acids): can lower triglycerides

Green tea: some research on its cholesterol-lowering capacity; epidemiologic evidence suggests that green tea may lower stroke and cardiovascular disease risk. There are several choices for green tea supplements: see Green Tea; Green Tea Decaffeinated; and Green Tea Organic.

Plant sterols: see Cardio Edge for a supplement featuring plant sterols in a formula designed to support healthy cholesterol levels

Garlic extracts: contact NYBC for information on allicin, a garlic extract that has been studied for cardiovascular health

The Mayo Clinic guide also mentions grains, including oat bran and flaxseed, which can lower cholesterol.

Last, the guide discusses red yeast rice, a supplement that can lower LDL cholesterol. Note the caution that some forms of red yeast rice may contain a naturally occurring form of the prescription medication lovastatin. Lovastatin in the supplement may present some dangers to the user, because there is no way to know the quantity or quality of this prescription medication equivalent. For that reason, it is especially important to consult with your healthcare provider and monitor your usage of this supplement.

See the Mayo Clinic guide at

Mayo Clinic: Cholesterol-lowering supplements: Lower your numbers without prescription medication

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Healthy cholesterol levels the botanical way

We’ve long known about certain supplements like niacin, pantethine, omega-3 fatty acids that can have an effect on cholesterol levels. In recent years, research attention has also focused on “plant sterols” and other botanical substances that can provide help in supporting healthy cholesterol levels.

Responding to this emerging science, supplement suppliers have devised some combination supplements. Among them is Douglas Lab’s Cardio-Edge, which includes: plant sterols (phytosterols) from soy; Sytrinol (a proprietary extract obtained from citrus and palm fruits); and pomegranate extract.

Here’s a little more detail on the product:

Cardio-Edge is designed to help maintain cardiovascular health and support healthy cholesterol levels. Sytrinol is intended to have the following effects, some of which you can monitor with routine bloodwork to assess its effect for you. These include:
1) Decrease apoprotein B, needed for LDL synthesis
2) Decrease action of an enzyme in the liver that makes triglycerides
3) Inhibit HMG-CoA reductase in the liver

Patented combination of citrus PMFs and alpha, delta and gamma tocotrienols derived from palm fruit (U.S. patents #6,251,400, and #6,239,114). Palm tocotrienols have been shown to inhibit HMG CoA reductase, the enzyme responsible for regulating cholesterol synthesis in the liver. Clinical studies in both animals and humans support Sytrinol’s role in reducing total and LDL-cholesterol as well as triglycerides.

Plant Sterols
Blood cholesterol is derived from the diet and synthesized in the liver. Sterols work by reducing the absorption of both forms of cholesterol – Sterols compete with cholesterol for absorption. Sterols and sterol esters can now be found in many foods including orange juice, rice drink, and margarine.

Pomegranate
Recent science has been focusing on the cardioprotective aspects of pomegranate. These brightly colored fruits contains numerous cornpounds known for their antioxidant capabilities, induding anthocyanidins, catechins, tannis, and gallic and ellagic acids. Research has shown that supplementation with pomegranate juice can decrease macrophage lipid accumulation, and cellular cholesterol accumulation in mice. Recently, research in humans has confirmed a beneficial effect of consuming pomegranate juice on parameters such as LDL oxidation, blood pressure, and blood vessel health.

In human clinical studies involving hypercholesterolemic subjects, no side effects were observed and four weeks of supplementing with a daily dose of 300 mg of Sytrinol.

See further information on recommended dosing on the NYBC website:

http://nybcsecure.org/product_info.php?products_id=284

Top search terms bringing visitors to this blog

Dear NYBC Blog Reader,

Thought you might be interested to see some of the most popular search terms that brought people to the New York Buyers’ Club Blog in the past year:

1. “Saccharomyces boulardii C difficile”
2. “glutamine ulcerative colitis”
3. “cholesterol lowering supplements”
4. “B vitamins depression”
5. “HIV Vitamin D”
6. “vitamins for neuropathy”
7. “Tylenol antidote”

And here, in very brief form, is the information these searchers found on the NYBC Blog:

Saccharomyces boulardii, which NYBC stocks in the form of Florastor, appears in a recent study to be the best probiotic for the stubborn gastrointestinal infection C. difficile.

Glutamine has shown effectiveness in reducing symptoms of ulcerative colitis and other gastrointestinal conditions in a number of research studies.

Plant sterols, fish oil, niacin, pantethine have been studied for cholesterol control.

B vitamins strongly affect mood and memory, and addressing a B vitamin deficiency can improve depressive symptoms.

Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent among people with HIV, and supplementing with 1000IU/day of D3 plus 1000mg/day of calcium may be a good way to support bone health for people taking HIV meds. Other research has noted the link between Vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, and susceptibility to cold and flus.

Acetylcarnitine, alpha lipoic acid and evening primrose oil are among the supplements studied for diabetic or HIV-related neuropathy (pain, tingling in feet, hands).

NAC (N-acetylcysteine) is used as the antidote to acetaminophen overdose. Acetaminophen is the active ingredient in Tylenol and is added to many other over-the-counter drugs, so overdose leading to liver damage or liver failure has become common in the US.