Pomegranate juice and heart health

In the past decade, there have been a number of studies of the potential of pomegranate juice to support cardiovascular health and provide additional health benefits as well. Recently we reviewed a research report published in 2012 that looked at the cardiovascular and immune system benefits of pomegranate juice for hemodialysis patients. This was a randomized placebo controlled double-blind trial (a kind of research design that is likely to produce reliably objective findings). The patients were followed for one year as they used pomegranate juicee three times a week while continuing their dialysis treatments. The results:

Pomegranate juice intake resulted in a significantly lower incidence rate of the second hospitalization due to infections. Furthermore, 25% of the patients in the pomegranate juice group had improvement and only 5% progression in the atherosclerotic process, while more than 50% of patients in the placebo group showed progression and none showed any improvement.

And the conclusion:

Prolonged pomegranate juice intake improves nontraditional CV [cardiovascular] risk factors, attenuates the progression of the atherosclerotic process, strengthens the innate immunity, and thus reduces morbidity among HD [hemodialysis] patients.

Of course, this research involved a special group of patients, those on hemodialysis. But, as a well-designed study, it does, we think, provide a fairly strong endorsement of the health benefits of pomegranate juice.

For more on pomegranate juice, see the NYBC entry

http://nybcsecure.org/product_info.php?cPath=40&products_id=333

Note that NYBC also carries the Douglas supplement Cardio-Edge, which includes pomegranate:

http://nybcsecure.org/product_info.php?cPath=35&products_id=284

Reference: Shema-Didi, L et al. One year of pomegranate juice intake decreases oxidative stress, inflammation, and incidence of infections in hemodialysis patients: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Free Radic Biol Med. 2012 Jul 15;53(2):297-304. doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2012.05.013. Epub 2012 May 17.

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New England Journal of Medicine Editorial: Vytorin and Zetia may not work, and should only be prescribed as a last resort

Here’s the latest news on Vytorin and Zetia, two drugs that are widely prescribed as cholesterol-lowering agents.

We repeat some of the suggestions we made when the failings of these two drugs were first revealed: consider such alternatives as statins plus niacin*; or a supplement based on plant sterols and other components, Cardio Edge from Douglas Labs.

* See NYBC entries for Niacin 100mg (recommended as initial dose to minimize “flushing”) and Niacin Timed-Release / Niatab 500mg, the full-strength dose.
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Journal Issues Warning on Two Cholesterol Drugs
New YorK Times
By ALEX BERENSON
Published: March 30, 2008

CHICAGO — Two widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs, Vytorin and Zetia, may not work and should be used only as a last resort, The New England Journal of Medicine said in an editorial published on Sunday.

The journal’s conclusion came as doctors at a major cardiology conference in Chicago saw for the first time the full results of a two-year clinical trial that showed that the drugs failed to slow, and might have even sped up, the growth of fatty plaques in the arteries. Growth of those plaques is closely correlated with heart attacks and strokes.

We accessed the full story at http://www.nytimes.com on 3/30/2008.