New @ NYBC – February 2015

supplement-header-2014These New Products and More
Available Through NYBC’s Newly-Redesigned Website & Co-Op Store

mega-pc-35-lecithin-1200mgMega PC-35 Lecithin – (Jarrow Formulas, 120 x 1200 mg; $9.75) Each softgel contains 1200 mg lecithin with choline 57 mg (from 35% PC lecithin) and 420 mg of phosphatidylcholine derived from soy. Phosphatidylcholine is a compound containing different types of fatty acids, glycerin, phosphorus and choline (a nitrogen-containing base). This may be an excellent product for people with hepatitis B or C, according to one well-designed study using 3 grams per day. Other benefits may be for mood enhancement for those with neurological disorders, to enhance cardiovascular health (in the context of a better diet), and possibly preventing or treating gallstones.

betaine-plus-pepsin-100-capsFor digestive health, NYBC is now carrying Twinlab’Betaine HCL Caps (100 caps $9.50). Each capsule contains betaine (as betaine hydrochloride) – 648 mg plus pepsin, 130 mg.

The addition of pepsin is thought to significantly improve the ability of the betaine to help the stomach lower the pH, that is, make the stomach more acid. That first amount of hydrochloric acid that your food hits arriving in the stomach is a crucial part of digestion. Betaine is typically used for people with a condition of low stomach acidity known as hypochlorhydria. This may actually be the problem even though one has reflux. It is a fairly common finding, for example, among people living with HIV, among a range of other conditions. Supplementing with betaine can help to improve digestion IF this is the case. Getting properly diagnosed before trying this is critically important. A 2013 study among healthy adults who had chemically-induced reduction in gastric acid (e.g., through proton-pump inhibitors) saw a reduction in stomach pH when given betaine supplements.

Uridine-5-monophosphate, 60 capsules for $22.20 from Jarrow. Each capsule contains 250 mg Uridine-5’-monophosphate disodium salt. Uridine is one of the nucleotides that is used by the RNA molecule. It is found in abundance incorporated in the phospholipid membranes of neural (especially brain) tissue. Data are limited but suggestive of benefits for memory and liver function. This is not dissimilar to an intervention utilized to help minimize mitochondrial toxicity associated with some antiretroviral drugs. One study suggested this could reduce damage to AZT or d4t (stavudine or Zerit)-related mitochondria, however, markers of inflammation were worsened. So this one should probably be used in the context of an anti-inflammatory protocol such as including carnitine, NAC, alpha lipoic, curcumin, omega-3 fatty acids and the like, which are a good idea anyway to keep TNF, IL-6 and hsCRP in check.

Astaxanthinastaxanthin-12-mg-30 12 mg – 30 softgels $16.25 from Jarrow Formulas. Astaxanthin is one of the many varieties of carotenoids (beta-carotene being one of the longest known and best characterized). Studies are somewhat mixed on the benefits of this agent to offset oxidative stress induced by exercise, with some benefit seen among soccer players and none for cyclists. One study using a mix of carotenoids showed an enhancement of visual acuity. Other small studies suggest benefits for increasing HDL, skin tone, and reflux frequency.


Garlic & Allicin  Sadly, NYBC no longer carries Dr. Zhang’s popular Allicin supplement,garlicell and arlipure however we have found these two excellent substitutes that indicate the amount of allicin and other components on the label. GarliPure from Natrol (120 “odor controlled” caps for $17). Each capsule contains 750 mcg of allicin along with 7.5 mg gamma glutamyl-cysteine, 5 mg allicin, 4 mg sulfur and 800 mcg of thiosulfinates, and GarliCell.
Source Naturals’ GarliCell features “no after-odor.” Each $14 bottle has 90 tablets; each tablet contains 6 mg (6000 mcg) of allicin along with 4.2 mg sulfur and 6 mg of thiosulfinates. Allicin is thought to possess the greatest activity of garlic’s various components. Early studies showed some pretty robust effects on cryptosporidiosis. Aside from anti-infective activity, there may be some benefit for maintaining a healthy blood lipid profile.


New Strengths + Sizes…

NYBC is now carrying a few new strengths and sizes of customer favorites. Our ever-popular “house brand” of CoQ10, Jarrow’s CoQ10 Q-Absorb, now is available in a very economical 120 x 100 mg softgel size for only $29. For those seeking a higher dose, we now also have CoQ10 400 mg (60 softgels) from Protocol for Life at $44.50.

curcumin-phytosome-jarrow-500-mg-60cNYBC has also picked up Jarrow Formulas‘ new Curcumin Phytosome (each cap 500 mg curcumin phytosome-phosphatidylcholine complex with 18-22% curcuminoids), a formulation that may further improve the absorption of curcumin. In the Ayurvedic tradition, recipes often include honey or black pepper, today known to enhance the body’s ability to absorb this increasingly important and well-researched anti-inflammatory agent.

Also new at NYBC…

calcium-blend-iron-free-easy-swallow-180A very moderately priced B100 (B Complex) from Twinlab for $11.75 that contains  100 mg of eachof the B-vitamins (and 100 mcg of B12). Each bottle, 100 capsules… Borage (Jarrow Formulas; 120 sg for $16.25) Provides one gram of polyunsaturated fatty acids from the Borago officinalis plant, including 240 mg of gamma linolenic acid (GLA/omega-3) and other fatty acids. This is a good source of GLA, especially in combination with flaxseed oil … New variation on SuperNutrition‘s Calcium Blend, an iron-free, easy-swallow formulation, same price ($14.25) and strength – just smaller (and more!) tablets.

NEW! Managing and Preventing HIV Med Side-Effects

To mark its fifth anniversary, the New York Buyers’ Club has prepared a special edition of SUPPLEMENT. In it you will find a concise Guide to managing and preventing HIV medication side effects with supplements and other complementary and alternative therapies.

This is an invaluable introduction to how nutritional supplements can be used to counter those side effects that can make life miserable–or even disrupt treatment adherence–in people taking antiretroviral medications for HIV.

Read about approaches to dealing with diarrhea, nausea, heart health issues, diabetes, insomnia, fatigue, liver stress, lipodystrophy, anxiety and depression.

This FREE Guide is available online at:

http://newyorkbuyersclub.org/

On the NYBC website you can also SUBSCRIBE to the nonprofit co-op’s quarterly FREE newsletter, THE SUPPLEMENT, which continues to offer a unique perspective on current evidence-based use of supplements for chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease, diabetes/insulin resistance, hepatitis and other liver conditions, anxiety/depression, osteoarthritis, cognitive and neurorological issues, and gastrointestinal dysfunction.

CoQ10 – 200mg

NYBC has recently decided to stock CoQ10 in a 200mg/capsule format (Jarrow)</, since many research studies involve supplementation at that daily level or even higher. As a not-for-profit purchasing co-op, NYBC seeks low-cost options for people choosing to use supplements, so this format from the well-regarded Jarrow line seemed a good value as well.

An extract from the NYBC write-up on this supplement–

Clinical studies have shown repeatedly that coenzyme Q10 has potent abilities to assist the heart muscle, and as an adjunct treatment for angina, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, hypertension (high blood pressure), and drug toxicity.

Research has also shown that as cellular levels of coenzyme Q10 decrease, HIV disease progresses. Other studies have documented its immune restorative qualities, including restoration of T cell function. Absorption of dietary fat soluble coenzyme Q10, due to the high inflammatory cytokine levels, is disrupted, so supplementation may help. Many PWHIV believe CoQ10 is an important nutrient to aid in detoxification if one uses nucleoside analogues (AZT ddI, ddC, d4T, etc.) or any toxic drug. Due to this impaired absorption, it’s best to take a form of CoQ10 that is mixed with lecithin or some other fat to improve its uptake. However, it may be that only very high doses will help (like 200-400 mg a day!) This will not be cheap.

CoQ10 is very helpful in conjunction with certain drugs. Studies have shown clear benefit when used with a heart toxic chemotherapy drug called adriamycin. In addition, some have suggested that it is very important to use CoQ10 when taking one of the statin drugs, used to manage high LDL cholesterol since the level of CoQ10 in the blood is depleted when using this class of drugs.

Lecithin and Your Liver

Lecithin has quite a deal of clinical data showing benefit for liver function, especially for alcohol-related liver damage. Supplementation with Lecithin improves glutathione levels as well as increasing plasma methionine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) levels–all of these being key markers to good liver function and health. (By the way, Lecithin supplementation is a lot less expensive way of raising SAMe levels than taking SAMe itself!) Other recent data suggest that Lecithin can help with elevated lipid levels (which are associated with cardiovascular disease) and type II diabetes (Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2006 Sep;16(6):395-404.). A small study also showed possible improvement in kids with cystic fibrosis (Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Mar;85(3):702-708).

Simple to take, too: one way is just to mix with other powders, such as protein powders, when making a nutritional shake.

For more on this dietary supplement, including dosing suggestions and certain cautions, see the entry on LECITHIN.

Here’s a brief quote from the entry:

“This may be an excellent product for people with hepatitis B or C, according to one well-designed study using 3 grams per day. Other benefits may be for mood enhancement for those with neurological disorders, to enhance cardiovascular health (in the context of a better diet) and possibly preventing or treating gallstones.”