NYBC to Continue!

JOIN OUR EFFORTS TO REVITALIZE!

Dear New York Buyers’ Club member,

You may have received an email from us last month informing you that we had made the painful decision to close the purchasing co-op component of the New York Buyers’ Club after ten years.

BUT NOW WE HAVE A PLAN FOR CONTINUING AND EXPANDING THE CO-OP!
A longtime member with significant nonprofit experience and passion about NYBC’s mission, Bob Lederer, has presented a plan that the board has accepted, to lead an effort to revitalize the organization. Bob will spend the next 3 months fundraising for and conducting a needs assessment of current and former Club members. To the extent the fundraising is successful, he will then spend up to another 7 months researching ways to strengthen the Club’s online and in-person marketing, and exploring partnerships in NYC and nationwide with healthcare organizations and groups representing people with HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, cancer, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses. Bob estimates that this work, and a very necessary upgrade of our software to a state-of-the-art online commerce site so we can better compete with supplement retailers, will require a total of about $100,000.

We have already begun to receive generous contributions and pledges. So we have decided to keep the purchasing co-op open, even as we continue to reorganize, and, most importantly, as we continue our fundraising campaign to stabilize and strengthen NYBC. Please spread the word to your friends! (Order through our website or (800) 650-4983).

We don’t know whether this revitalization effort will succeed, but we want to give it our best shot. Key to the plan’s success will be the involvement of our members. That’s where you come in. There are several ways you can get involved, whether you are in New York or ANYWHERE.

Please email us at contact.nybc@newyorkbuyersclub.org and tell us how you can help us revitalize by:

Joining us at the first of a series of NYBC Membership Meetings on Thursday, July 17 at 6:00 PM at DC 1707 (the union that houses us), 420 W. 45th St., in Manhattan, bet. 9th & 10th Aves. (room to be announced). Refreshments at 6 PM, meeting promptly at 6:30. We will put forward our preliminary analysis of fiscal and technological challenges that we face, as well as our initial revitalization plans, seek your input and suggestions, and break into working groups to begin the tasks of outreach, fundraising, and marketing that are necessary to revitalize this grassroots organization! We are also arranging for remote participation using conference call, Google Hangout (somewhat like Skype), and perhaps other online methods – details to follow. Please RSVP.

Making a donation. Please be as generous as you can. We are grateful to those who have already stepped forward.

Reaching out to your friends and colleagues to raise funds. But note that while we always welcome any contributions that people can comfortably afford to give, at this time we are focusing on obtaining major donations of $1,000 or more. So we’d welcome any introductions to such potential donors. We can send a board or staff member along with you to a meeting with such folks if you’d like.

Helping with:
o grant writing
o writing/editing educational or marketing materials
o doing design/layout work
o computer work
o outreach to other health and community organizations about our services.

Offering suggestions either for fundraising or marketing to expand the pool of people we serve.

Sending us a short testimonial (1 to 4 sentences) that we can use publicly about why NYBC’s services and/or particular products have been particularly important in maintaining your health or staving off symptoms or side effects.

Joining us in a follow-up briefing/work session by conference call and/or online services such as Google Hangout, to be held later in the summer (details to be announced).

You the members are our strength. Together, we can save and grow NYBC!
Thanks for all you’ve done,

George Carter, NYBC Administrator/Education Director
and the Board of Directors of NYBC

Lark Lands on the 7 Deadly Sins for those wishing to live long and well with HIV

We’re re-printing below an excerpt from a piece Lark Lands wrote several years ago, because it still has much solid advice for people with HIV/AIDS. A medical journalist and longtime AIDS treatment educator and advocate, Lark was a pioneer in focusing attention on an integrated, “holistic” approach to HIV disease. She served as science editor for POZ magazine, and has also been a contributor to Canadian AIDS Treatment Information Exchange (CATIE) publications.

The title of this piece is “The 7 Deadly Sins for those wishing to live long and well with HIV.” This excerpt has to do with nutrient needs (but see also the other sections, including those on gastrointestinal health and maintaining muscle mass.)


Sin #2: Ignoring the nutrient needs that both the disease and the medicines create.

Whether or not you’re taking antiretrovirals, your body is fighting an ongoing battle. It needs higher levels of nutrients to do that. You can’t power the body’s immune response or build replacement immune cells without the nutrient building blocks. You need to consume:

–good levels of protein
–good levels of unrefined complex carbohydrates (brown rice instead of white; whole-grain breads, crackers, cookies and pasta instead of those made with nutrient-poor white flour)
lots of fresh fruits and vegetables
–moderate amounts of good fats every day (monounsaturated fats like olive oil are best; avoid the partially hydrogenated oils found in margarines, shortenings and many baked goods and snack foods. Read the labels!)
–lots of healthful liquids (water, juices, teas — not chemical- and sugar-loaded junk drinks)

That’s how you power your body to keep up the immense battle against HIV. Numerous studies have shown that disease progression is faster in people with low levels of nutrients, so remember, nutrients are one of your best weapons against HIV. (Always make sure that the food you eat and the water you drink is safe.)

Nutrients can also help prevent or reduce the side effects and toxicity of medications while improving their absorption. You can help your body handle all the pills you’re taking by giving it good nutrition, lots of healthful fluids, appropriate supplementation and plenty of liver and kidney support.

With liver-toxic drugs: Consider L-carnitine (or L-acetyl-carnitine), and the nutrients that maintain glutathione levels in the liver — alpha-lipoic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and L-glutamine. Depending on drug interactions (check!), silymarin (milk thistle extract) may also be useful.

To help with kidney stress: Drink lots of water throughout the day. Aim for a large glass every hour or so, especially each time you pop your pills.

Don’t forget that nutrient supplementation can often help reduce or possibly eliminate HIV-related symptoms such as fatigue, skin problems, diarrhea and gas, memory loss, neuropathy and more. In order to manage a difficult disease long-term, you need to feel good!