We be JAMA! Report: Multivitamin + selenium slows progression of early-stage HIV

We’re tempted to file this story under the heading of “news that we already knew,” but it’s still good to get a stamp of approval in the form of publication in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), one of the top medical journals in the U.S., if not the world.

At NYBC and at our predecessor DAAIR we have long recognized the development of vitamin and mineral deficiencies in HIV, and have long recommended multivitamin/mineral supplements to counter those health-threatening deficiencies. We have also followed for years the work of Marianna Baum, lead author of the JAMA study, who has focused attention on the mineral selenium, which may have an important role in preventing replication of HIV. So, while this story doesn’t come as a complete surprise, it’s great to have further support for some long-held practices.

The combination of a daily multivitamin
plus the mineral selenium

proved to be an effective regimen,
cutting by about half

the risk of reaching the point
where ARV therapy would be recommended

Baum’s study was conducted in Botswana, where nearly one in four adults is infected with HIV. The trial followed about 900 newly infected adults who were not yet taking any HIV medications. These participants were divided into groups that randomly received different combinations of vitamins, the mineral selenium, or a placebo. Over the study’s two-year period, the combination of a daily multivitamin plus the mineral selenium proved to be the effective regimen, cuting by about half the risk of reaching the point where ARV therapy would be recommended in Botswana (CD4 count of 200-250).

Baum’s findings are especially relevant for early-stage HIV infection, where the multivitamin + selenium combination proved its value in cutting risk of progression, and actually decreased the likelihood that participants would reach the point where antiretroviral meds would be recommended. Other research, such as Dr. Jon Kaiser’s study of a multivitamin + antioxidants, has been directed at those who are using antiretroviral meds, and may have developed some symptoms or side effects such as peripheral neuropathy. Kaiser’s finding that the multivitamin + antioxidants combination could increase CD4 counts led to the development of K-PAX, and also motivated NYBC to offer its MAC Pack, a close equivalent of K-PAX, assembled from hand-picked products from NYBC’s catalog.

Taken together, the Baum and Kaiser studies suggest to us the value of long-term supplementation strategies that can slow progression of HIV, oppose the known, damaging deficiencies that are likely to develop with HIV, and help stabilize and even improve health for people with HIV, whether they are taking antiretroviral meds or not.

 

If you’d like to get started with NYBC’s MAC-Pack, or if you’d like to find a multivitamin + selenium combination,
please visit our website. You can also call our toll-free number at (800) 650-4983
for further information and advice about supplement strategies for HIV.

supplement-header-2014
This article from the Spring 2014 edition of SUPPLEMENT: Newsletter of the New York Buyers’ Club, available for download at http://www.NewYorkBuyersClub.org

 

References:

Baum, M. et al. Effect of Micronutrient Supplementation on Disease Progression in Asymptomatic, Antiretroviral-Naive, HIV-Infected Adults in Botswana: : A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2013;310(20):2154-2163. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.280923. 

Kaiser, J. Micronutrient Supplementation Increases CD4 Count in HIV-infected Individuals on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: A Prospective, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Kaiser JK, et al. JAIDS 2006;42[5]: 523-528.

 

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