Symptoms common, often ignored by docs

A recent report underscored the myriad symptoms and problems facing significant numbers of people living with HIV. The study involved 751 patients enrolled in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study, undertaken between 1999 and 2000. Commonly reported symptoms included fatigue (71%), difficulty sleeping, depression, muscle aches and diarrhea (each reported by 60% of the respondents). Over 50% of patients reported headache, difficulty remembering, tingling hands or feet (neuropathy), weight loss and body shape changes.

The worry is that some may be associated with meds and this may reduce adherence to drug schedules. This can lead to resistance, etc. Which is why we at NYBC take very seriously the methods and means that may be available to manage some of these side effects. Diarrhea has been managed in studies that investigated agents like calcium and glutamine. Acetylcarnitine has some benefit for nuke-related neuropathy. You can review our literature on what we know (and need to learn more) about such interventions along with the different symptoms and side effects people experience and how they can be managed.

The study included about 54% African American. The study noted that healthcare providers often don’t recognize these as important symptoms. Perhaps this is why there is a strong racist element within American health care, one that arises out of blindness and ignorance as much as any overt hostility.

The second aspect of such care is that many people, of every ethnicity, are economically impoverished. So how can many people access sometimes costly, nearly always out-of-pocket agents like acetylcarnitine? NYBC is working on ways to make this possible, though we will need additional help to assure such access. State-run programs like ADAP and Medicaid can help in some states–but many of these programs are facing cuts due to tight budgets. Tight budgets induced by banks getting a socialized bailout for their malfeasance while Americans suffer?

So political activism will remain a key component in any comprehensive effort to provide care and treatment that includes the types of agents NYBC investigates and makes available. Ongoing research into dietary supplements and the ways in which they may improve health outcomes, enhance adherence to medications, reduce side effects and lower the burden of public costs by reducing morbidity and mortality are keenly needed.

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