Niacin to increase HDL

Helping reduce cardiovascular risk is crucial. This may be a safer and smarter way than use of the limited statins that can by used along with antiretrovirals (ARV). However, some people have significant flushing and itching reactions; this can be offset by the use of lower doses, gradually escalating over time.

Short-term effects of extended-release niacin on endothelial function in HIV-infected patients on stable antiretroviral therapy

“In summary, this pilot study demonstrated that short-term niacin therapy could improve endothelial function in HIV-infected individuals on stable ART who have low HDL-c.”

AIDS: 24 April 2010

Chow, Dominic C; Stein, James H; Seto, Todd B; Mitchell, Carol; Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; Grandinetti, Andrew; Gerschenson, Mariana; Shiramizu, Bruce; Souza, Scott; Shikuma, Cecilia aHawaii Center for AIDS, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA bDivision of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA cPublic Health Sciences, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

Abstract

Objective: To assess the short-term effects of extended-release niacin (ERN) on endothelial function in HIV-infected patients with low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) levels.

Methods: Randomized controlled study to determine the short-term effects of ERN on endothelial function, measured by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, in HIV-infected adults with low HDL-c. Participants on stable HAART with fasting HDL-c less than 40 mg/dl and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol less than 130 mg/dl were randomized to ERN or control arms. ERN treatment started at 500 mg/night and titrated to 1500 mg/night for 12 weeks. Controls received the same follow-up but were not given ERN (no placebo). Participants were excluded if they had a history of cardiac disease, uncontrolled hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or were on lipid-lowering medications such as statins and fibrates. Change in FMD was compared between arms with respect to baseline HDL-c.

Results: Nineteen participants were enrolled: 89% men, median age 50 years, 53% white/non-Hispanic, median CD4 cell count 493 cells/µl, and 95% of them had HIV RNA below 50 copies/ml. Participants receiving ERN had a median HDL-c (interquartile range) increase of 3.0 mg/dl (0.75 to 5.0) compared with -1.0 mg/dl in controls (-6.0 to 2.5), a P value is equal to 0.04. The median change in FMD was 0.91% (-2.95 to 2.21) for ERN and -0.48% (-2.65 to 0.98) for controls (P = 0.67). However, end of study FMD for ERN was significantly different from controls after adjusting for baseline differences in FMD and HDL-c, 6.36% (95% confidence interval 4.85-7.87) and 2.73% (95% confidence interval 0.95-4.51) respectively, a P value is equal to 0.048.

Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrated that short-term niacin therapy could improve endothelial function in HIV-infected patients with low HDL-c.

Introduction

The incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) in HIV-infected individuals has been increasing. Although much of the coronary artery disease (CAD) risk in the HIV population has been attributed to elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) and hypertriglyceridemia, low levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) also contribute to CAD risk. In the general population, low serum levels of HDL-c are associated with increased risk for MI, restenosis after angioplasty, sudden cardiac death, and stroke [1-3]. The primary mechanism by which HDL-c exerts its atheroprotective effect is believed to be reverse cholesterol transport; however, HDL-c also has antioxidant effects [4]. Additionally, HDL-c has direct arterial effects that help preserve endothelial function. Endothelial dysfunction is an early phenomenon in atherosclerosis that precedes structural changes of the arterial wall and clinical manifestations of CAD [5]. This protective effect of HDL-c on endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity may depend on the binding of HDL-c to scavenger receptor class B type I and subsequent stimulation of nitric oxide formation [6]. HDL-c activates both extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt, resulting in enhanced stability of endothelial nitric oxide synthase [7].

In dyslipidemic HIV-infected patients on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART), low levels of HDL-c have been associated with endothelial dysfunction [8]. Moreover, use of statins in HIV-infected patients on ART improves endothelial function [9]. We hypothesized that increases in HDL-c associated with the use of niacin also would improve endothelial function in HIV-infected individuals. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study to assess the effects of niacin on endothelial function in HIV-infected patients with low HDL-c levels.
(click above for the complete article on NATAP)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s